Tits Galore In London Theatre! Molly Wobbly’s Tit Factory And Tory Boys

Keith McDonnell
Authored by
Keith McDonnell

September 24, 2013
2:28 p.m.

Molly Wobbly’s Tit Factory
Wobbly tits – two words I never thought I’d be using in a London Theatre theatre blog. Until now that is. The Hackney Empire is home to what promises to be the most outrageous musical since ‘Jerry Springer The Opera’ was shoved down our throats by the National Theatre a decade ago, namely Molly Wobbly’s Tit Factory which has just opened and runs until 5 October. But who is Molly Wobbly? The town of Little Happening gets an unexpected makeover when a creepy, devious stranger arrives on Mammary Lane, promising personal improvement to three unhappy women.

MWTF

Packed full of catchy, raunchy songs and larger than life characters, Molly Wobbly contains over twenty irreverent numbers and comes with a health warning – those with a dodgy ticker should give it a wide berth as it’s not for the faint hearted.

Part ‘Carry-On,’ part British musical hall, its roots are definitely planted in good old end-of-the-pier humour. It has a splendid cast, including TV favourite Gary Wilmot and Sam Buttery, who was not only a finalist in ‘The Voice,’ but made a sensational role debut as Leigh Bowery in the off-West End revival of ‘Taboo’ last year.  There are also cuties galore, in the form of Conleth Kane, Christopher Finn and Russell Morton. No musical worth its salt is without a troupe of dancing nuns, and yes, you’ve guessed it – there’s one in this show as well.

We can’t promise dancing nuns in the National Youth Theatre’s revival of James Graham’s ‘Tory Boyz,’ but given the recent deep Conservative divide which was exposed by the recent vote on gay marriage, Graham has updated his original script to make this an even more explosive and poignant play. Expect fireworks and Ann Widdecombe frothing at the fanny – well maybe not the last bit!

Tory Boyz
First seen five years’ ago at the Soho Theatre, Tory Boyz is a bold and astute political comedy that takes us behind the scenes of the corridors of power at Westminster where saving face and avoiding scandal is the order of the day. With a cast made up of the company’s most talented performers aged 18-25, this revival promises to not only deliver a caustic take on modern politics but showcase the best from the next generation of world class actors. There are performances until November at the Ambassador’s Theatre.

 

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